News

New The Elder Scrolls Online dev diary shows off gameplay and gathering
Posted: 18.05.2013 15:19 by Comments: 14
Bethesda has released a new developer diary for The Elder Scrolls Online, showing off gameplay and some of the gathering and possible crafting that the player will be able to engage in.

“It’s not just useless stuff,” according to creative Director Paul Sage when the player grabs seemingly innocuous things like bread off an altar. “Right now, you can take any one of these items that you find and it’s going to be part of a recipe. It’s going to be part of our crafting system. Yes, you’ll go out into the world, and you’ll explore and you’ll find plants and many of the other things that you expect - but it all starts right in town.”

The Elderr Scrolls games, Oblivion and Skyrim in particular, have been considered "single player MMOs". Strategy Informer will be getting some close-up looks at this game at E3 2013, and we'll let you know how the series fairs as an actual MMO.

Check out the dev diary in the video below.

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Comments

By nocutius (SI Elite) on May 18, 2013
nocutius
So far it doesn't look bad, it seems pretty similar to what we're used to, I'd guess that's the main point of the video.
By LukeDion1987 (SI Core Member) on May 18, 2013
LukeDion1987
^ Yes, you're right... But I don't like MMOs. But I do like Elder Scrolls games...
By Voqar (SI Core Member) on May 18, 2013
Voqar
I love MMOs and have high hopes for this game. Unless it turns out to be F2P and cash shop hooks destroy the immersion on a regular basis and/or make the game pay to win for scrubs who can't be bothered to play to earn.

Not much to this video and while it's not make or break, some of the animations for stuff like crafting look pretty slick, and if your core game is solid, those little touches are what really puts it over the top.
By herodotus (SI Herodotus) on May 19, 2013
herodotus
Nope, I'm afraid I'm not interested. The only true F2P models I have seen are currently in use with "Champions Online" and "Star Trek Online" (yes you CAN spend cash instead of exchanging in-game currency for real world cash, but you never have to and you'll never be one step ahead by doing so). The rest, are most definitely 'pay-to-play' and I have a feeling, s strong one, that Bethesda is reading Blizzard's "Auction House" statements a little too much for comfort.
By JonahFalcon (SI Elite) on May 19, 2013
JonahFalcon
Turbine's FTP modes are better in D&D Online and LOTRO.
By Voqar (SI Core Member) on May 19, 2013
Voqar
GW2's B2P is ok. Problem is the player economy sucks because nothing really has any value except ultra rare stuff, usually obtained thru insane grinding or mystic forge randomness, or stuff got thru the store. Then you throw in the fact that you can pay cash for gems, and trade gems for in-game currency, and you basically have facilitated gold buying with ANet taking a cut. Ie, scantioned cheating.

I think pay to play is better for players. You get a flat fee to have access to everything - limited only by how much you play and/or how well you play (which is vastly superior to being limited by how much extra you're willing to pay), you don't have cash hooks in your face regularly cheapening the experience and ruining immersion, and you usually have an overall higher quality base since you're surrounded by people willing to pay for entertainment rather than wannabe freeloaders (or people goofy enough to spend $200 for a founders pak for a supposedly free game, for ex, or who end up paying more than $15/mo in F2P games on frivolous junk that should be available thru playing and/or P2W cheese).

TESO is posted at $60 on amazon, which doesn't mean that much, but could be a sign that TESO won't be totally F2P. Either B2P or P2P. I'm hoping both TESO and EQNext have subs and match the quality of old school sub-based games like WoW, EQLive, DAoC, FF, etc. Kinda scared about EQNext since most, if not all, SOE MMO's are F2P now.

F2P sucks for players. It's more profitable for companies so they are doing it. They're not doing it for the player's benefit. They don't care that it lowers the quality of the gaming experience if it increases profits.
By herodotus (SI Herodotus) on May 19, 2013
herodotus
Voqar, try playing "STO" or "CO" and then tell me the quality has suffered. In general though, the F2P model is constructed to draw players in and before they know it (and they're hooked by the game) they are paying to continue or get ahead of the competition.

Jonah, "LoTR" requires purchasing of "realms" to expand your play area, so I wouldn't include that in a near-to-perfect F2P model. Don't know about "D&DO".
By JonahFalcon (SI Elite) on May 19, 2013
JonahFalcon
D&DO allows you to do things like purchase classes to play, so you can customize your gaming experience. Like, if you want to play a Druid, you can pay a few dollars to have that class be accessible. People have found that spending $20 is enough for a full experience for them.
By herodotus (SI Herodotus) on May 19, 2013
herodotus
See in "STO" you don't need to pay real cash for any of that. If there is something you want from the store, do a few dailies for a week, refine the Dilithium and exchange it for Zen (Perfect World's real money system). Never a real red cent need ever change hands.
By nocutius (SI Elite) on May 19, 2013
nocutius
Lotro technically is f2p but you have to buy the quest packs unless you're willing to spend a huge amount of time grinding Turbine points with your alts. So for altholics it actually is free but if you only want to play one character you will absolutely have to buy the expansions, no way around it.
By nikola1010 (SI Core Member) on May 19, 2013
nikola1010
Here we can see all sorts of miscellaneous things a player can do, but I wonder why they haven't put that in Skyrim??? In Fable: The Lost Chapters you had fishing, barber services, marrige, sex, gambling (and good one too), very good spells, children of different ages and appearences... It looks like Bethesda doesn't look at what their competition is douing. This looks more like WoW set in Tamriel with Elder Scrolls instead.
By JonahFalcon (SI Elite) on May 20, 2013
JonahFalcon
WHAT? That looks NOTHING, repeat, NOTHING like World of Warcraft.
By nikola1010 (SI Core Member) on May 25, 2013
nikola1010
I didn't say that it looks exactly like WOW, but it uses the same concept.
By herodotus (SI Herodotus) on May 26, 2013
herodotus
Mr. Falcon has finally emerged from the closet. A "WoW" fan at heart....who'd have guessed?