News

Microsoft affirms PC gaming still a priority, just seems like "a dip"
Posted: 26.03.2009 13:25 by Simon Priest Comments: 3
Speaking at the GDC, Games For Windows Live man Dave Luehmann has said the firm is pumping more cash into PC games "than we have in quite a while."

They've got "several titles" in development, both with external and internal teams right now says the exec and are actively hunting for more "content partners" at this week's GDC.

Microsoft has closed down a slew of studios and cut back on investment to help trim falls in revenue. The veteran ACES Studio behind Flight Simulator and Age of Empires' Ensemble were high notable casualties.

"We've got several titles in development right now, both internally developed and with external partners," Luehmann told Gamasutra.

"We're here at GDC negotiating another deals, and we're here at GDC looking for other content partners. I'd say our position in Windows over the last six months has gone from a steady state, to a dip from a point of view of the press, but realistically we're putting more money into Windows games than we have in quite a while."

With the rise of the Xbox 360 console, Microsoft no longer has the PC's back as it once did when it comes to videogaming.

Comments

By herodotus (SI Herodotus) on Mar 26, 2009
herodotus
I'd like to see the return of Microprose and Ensemble, to start with, but the economy just can't support them right now. Hopefully M$ will inject some of it's gaming capital back into PC gaming, but their cash cow is still the console.
By benny180 (SI Core) on Mar 26, 2009
benny180
Didnt know Ensemble where closed down, age of empires was one of the strategy games i ever played..."sniff"!
By FoolWolf (SI Elite) on Mar 27, 2009
FoolWolf
seems like a dip?
You are loosing credabilit with gamers and there are new markets rising to take the spot to deliver to PC gamers what PC gamers crave - none port-like console leftovers!

Miss the train and Windows may turn out to be a bottom low OS for gaming on computers... Now would that be called a a percievable dip then?