Review

Medieval Lords: Build, Defend, Expand Review (PC)

The foundation of the modern western world was the middle ages in Europe. The barbarian tribes that overran the old imperial Rome built a thriving society, and introduced new concepts in both government and science, that helped shape the world we live in today. For many of us, there is a boundless fascination with this period, that game companies are only to happy to attempt to fill. Medieval Lords is the latest attempt at this, and it is a very good effort at filling that interest for gamers.

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Many of us are familiar with the city building series that culminated in games such as Caesar III. Like that afformentioned title, players of this game must build their city, improve buildings, make the population happy, and eventually expand and take other nations, so you get bot a city building element and an empire building one as well.

You will select where to construct your buildings, and what good and services they will have access to, based on building availability, and distance in the road net. Terrain effects as also taken into account, building next to a river improves health and water supply, while building near a bog might cause plague and wide spread sickness. This is an important consideration, often left out of city builders, that usually let you build where ever you like, with few consequences.

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As population increases, your buildings will expand and evolve, as is the standard in this type of game. You can also monitor the progress of your villagers, and find out what their needs and wants are, and this is a help in decided what to build next. Certain buildings improve matters, such as building a stone mason, and a carpenter's shop, both greatly improve buildings and help with upgrades.

Life in this era was dangerous, and this is simulated by enemy invasions and attacks by brigands and other evil types. Seaborne attacks are possible, and all these matters must be taken into consideration. Fortunately, there are many defensive improvements and structures to construct, but these cost money, so a thriving economy is a must. But so also is keeping the peasants safe, if you fail to defend them, they will not multiply, and may even leave your kingdom. If you don't bother with defenses, and enemy could easily destroy all you have built, so get that castle and keep constructed, and walls and barricades for the hapless peasants, and things will certainly work in your favor.

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Invasion of other territories plays its part in the game also. You move your armies into their territory, and there is a pause to build offensive and defensive post ions, and then the attack commences. The enemy may very well counter-attack, so be aware of this, and defend your home base, or suffer the fait of failed kings, the chopping block.

The game is nice to look at, and plays fairly well. The game interface isn't over complicated, so control of your forces isn't too difficult. The game also provides learning tutorials to help you understand and build your kingdoms, and this greatly simplifies learning the game. The sound is nice also, the tracts fit the mood of the overall game nicely.

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have to admit, I have always been a fan of city builders, watching a few houses become a power full town is always a fun game play experience for me. Medieval lords provides good entertainment along those lines, and play is interesting enough to keep you busy for some time, while building your kingdom. By all means pick this game up.


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